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Publisher: GT Interactive Software
Developer: Epic Games

Minimum System Requirements:

P200 MHx or better
Memory: 32MB RAM
100MB HD space min. (450 recommended)
CD-ROM
Windows 95 Compatible Sound Card
PCI Local Bus Video Card
Windows 95/Windows 98/Windows NT
Network and Internet Play via TCP/IP

Genre: First Person Shooter
ESRB Rating: Mature (17+)

Da Introduction:

Unreal Tournament is a hugely multiplayer oriented shooter, with a somewhat downplayed single player element. Instead of a cutscene to start off the game, UT begins with a great in-game cinematic with voice narration giving you a peek into the world of UT. Sometime around the year 2291 the New Earth Government legalized combat zones and eventually these combat zones became the most highly watched sport in the media. You are just one of these futuristic gladiators with the eventual goal of winning the tournament.

Da Installation:

The install would have been just fine if my CD-ROM drive hadn't stopped running in the middle of copying the files, but eventually it worked.

Da Graphics:

UT is the best looking 3D shooter put out in a long while. The backgrounds of the outdoor maps are stunningly detailed and downright beautiful, especially the space maps. Although the outdoor environments are huge and well detailed the graphics don't choke up your system at critical times. On my slow, outdated Voodoo2 even the map Facing Worlds looked damn fine and played even better. The indoor locations are slightly less stunning but the use of different textures and, believe it or not, colours other than brown, gray, and yellow (*cough* Quake 3) are used in the levels.

Da Sound:

While not completely over the top the sounds in UT are well done and get the job done. Each weapon has a distinct fire sound, gruff, but nonetheless satisfying. The sounds in UT are a strong improvement from Unreal, where mini-guns are known to sound like toasters with a whole other load of sound issues. Probably the coolest addition to the sounds of UT is the voice that comes on and says something like "First Blood" or at another point where the player does something extraordinary. The only weak point to address about the sound in UT is the music. The music isn't on par with the techno blood pounding music of most shooters on the market, and it does nothing to felicitate a stronger gaming experience.

Da Gameplay:

Off the shelves there is no question about which shooter is better, it's easily UT. There are simply more modes of play to choose from to keep you interested, other than just Deathmatch and Capture the Flag as per Q3A. Assault, Domination, Last Man Standing and several other modes of play keep UT fresh and furious. However the gameplay lags significantly after you get over the visual awe inspired by each new level. Where the Deathmatch really lags is in the level design. Although flashy and articulately constructed, each level quickly loses its appeal after only a few short minutes of play. Long drawn out hallways and even some seemingly pointless dead-end hallways combined with awkward weapon and ammo placement bogs the intensity of a multiplayer game down. Don't get me wrong, each and every level in Unreal Tournament knocked me on my ass when I first laid eyes on them, it was the replay that was awful. The large number of maps doesn't suggest that UT strove for quantity not quality, merely inexperience. Many of the levels suffered from extreme obesity when there really was no need to have such a large area to fight in.

As a gladiator of the tournament the single player element of UT is much like Quake 3; win a series of bouts with enemy bots and you will emerge victorious. You get to test your mettle in Deathmatch, Assault, Capture the Flag, and Domination. The Deathmatch isn't really spectacular, but that is mostly because the appeal of deathmatch games is wearing thin. Where Unreal Tournament really shines is in its team based modes of play. The first is Domination, where players are challenged with capturing and holding certain locations in a map. Controlling each location allows points to be allocated to the teams score. My personal favorite was Assault, where one team takes the role of the attackers and must storm a base, and the other team is given the task of defending the same base. The level design in the assault maps is well thought out and shows no symptoms of the Deathmatch levels, and the flow of the levels is greatly increased. Even with bots, playing Assault is filled with excitement and intense action, and online with human opponents each match is different and action packed.

Weapon variety is quite good in Unreal Tournament, and the diversity is much stronger than I expected after Unreal. However I have a suspicious feeling that most of the weapons were in Unreal as well. Rocket launcher junkies will be relieved to see that the eightball gun has been replaced with a rocket launcher that fires instantly but still has the option to store up multiple rockets for one apocalyptic barrage. But the game designers must have been sleeping when they put in the ridiculously fun

Unreal Tournament

 

Unreal Tournament

ESRB: Rating Pending - RP
Platform: PC Games
Category: Action Games
 
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9.5
 
Author:
Publisher: GT Interactive Software Developer: Epic Games Minimum System Requirements: P200 MHx or better Memory: 32MB RAM 100MB HD space min. (450 recommended) CD-ROM Windows 95 Compatible Sound Card PCI Local Bus Video Card Windows 95/Windows 98/Windows NT Network and Internet Play via TCP/IP Genre: First Person Shooter ESRB Rating: Mature (17+) Da Introduction: Unreal Tournament is a hugely multiplayer oriented shooter, with a somewhat downplayed single player element. Instead of a cutscene to start off the game, UT begins with a great in-game cinematic with voice narration giving you a peek into the world of UT. Sometime around the year 2291 the New Earth Government legalized combat zones and eventually these combat zones became the most highly watched sport in the media. You are just one of these futuristic gladiators with the eventual goal of winning the tournament. Da Installation: The install would have been just fine if my CD-ROM drive hadn't stopped running in the middle of copying the files, but eventually it worked. Da Graphics: UT is the best looking 3D shooter put out in a long while. The backgrounds of the outdoor maps are stunningly detailed and downright beautiful, especially the space maps. Although the outdoor environments are huge and well detailed the graphics don't choke up your system at critical times. On my slow, outdated Voodoo2 even the map Facing Worlds looked damn fine and played even better. The indoor locations are slightly less stunning but the use of different textures and, believe it or not, colours other than brown, gray, and yellow (*cough* Quake 3) are used in the levels. Da Sound: While not completely over the top the sounds in UT are well done and get the job done. Each weapon has a distinct fire sound, gruff, but nonetheless satisfying. The sounds in UT are a strong improvement from Unreal, where mini-guns are known to sound like toasters with a whole other load of sound issues. Probably the coolest addition to the sounds of UT is the voice that comes on and says something like "First Blood" or at another point where the player does something extraordinary. The only weak point to address about the sound in UT is the music. The music isn't on par with the techno blood pounding music of most shooters on the market, and it does nothing to felicitate a stronger gaming experience. Da Gameplay: Off the shelves there is no question about which shooter is better, it's easily UT. There are simply more modes of play to choose from to keep you interested, other than just Deathmatch and Capture the Flag as per Q3A. Assault, Domination, Last Man Standing and several other modes of play keep UT fresh and furious. However the gameplay lags significantly after you get over the visual awe inspired by each new level. Where the Deathmatch really lags is in the level design. Although flashy and articulately constructed, each level quickly loses its appeal after only a few short minutes of play. Long drawn out hallways and even some seemingly pointless dead-end hallways combined with awkward weapon and ammo placement bogs the intensity of a multiplayer game down. Don't get me wrong, each and every level in Unreal Tournament knocked me on my ass when I first laid eyes on them, it was the replay that was awful. The large number of maps doesn't suggest that UT strove for quantity not quality, merely inexperience. Many of the levels suffered from extreme obesity when there really was no need to have such a large area to fight in. As a gladiator of the tournament the single player element of UT is much like Quake 3; win a series of bouts with enemy bots and you will emerge victorious. You get to test your mettle in Deathmatch, Assault, Capture the Flag, and Domination. The Deathmatch isn't really spectacular, but that is mostly because the appeal of deathmatch games is wearing thin. Where Unreal Tournament really shines is in its team based modes of play. The first is Domination, where players are challenged with capturing and holding certain locations in a map. Controlling each location allows points to be allocated to the teams score. My personal favorite was Assault, where one team takes the role of the attackers and must storm a base, and the other team is given the task of defending the same base. The level design in the assault maps is well thought out and shows no symptoms of the Deathmatch levels, and the flow of the levels is greatly increased. Even with bots, playing Assault is filled with excitement and intense action, and online with human opponents each match is different and action packed. Weapon variety is quite good in Unreal Tournament, and the diversity is much stronger than I expected after Unreal. However I have a suspicious feeling that most of the weapons were in Unreal as well. Rocket launcher junkies will be relieved to see that the eightball gun has been replaced with a rocket launcher that fires instantly but still has the option to store up multiple rockets for one apocalyptic barrage. But the game designers must have been sleeping when they put in the ridiculously fun ‘Biorifle'. Although somewhat underpowered the gun is strangely fun, once you start using it your fate is sealed. The bots that are included in Unreal Tournament are actually not that bad, they use weapons when the time is right and they can actually defeat you if you take your attention off them. I was most impressed when I tried to pump up the number of bots in a game for about 2 a side to about 6 on each side. To my surprise my system handled it without choking at all. Da Conclusion: Unreal Tournament is a downright excellent shooter, but the saving grace of this game might lie in its out of the box teamplay mods. Quake 3 Arena shipped with deathmatch and CTF and we are still waiting for the heavier teamplay mods to be released. Just beware of the overly flashy levels, for they aren't as cool as you might originally think. Graphics: 10 Sound: 9 Gameplay: 9.5 Tilt: 9.5 Unreal Tournament was reviewed by DA GAMEBOYZ contributor David Chapman on his: Celeron 400 64MB RAM Windows 98 Voodoo2 12MB Diamond Stealth II 4MB IntelliMouse Optical Sidewinder Pro



 
 

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