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Developer: Novalogic
Publisher: Novalogic

Da Introduction:

My first real experience with a real-time first-person shooter was Doom. The idea of running around a large map, using a variety of weapons to blow away a variety of monsters very much appealed to me. Even then, though, I was wondering how even such a well-muscled space marine could lug around seven or eight different weapons at the same time, along with several hundred rounds of ammunition. Delta Force 2 is decidedly more realistic in this regard. While still technically a first-person shooting game, it differs substantially from the

Delta Force 2

 

Delta Force 2

ESRB: Rating Pending - RP
Platform: PC Games
Category: Action Games
 
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Developer: Novalogic Publisher: Novalogic Da Introduction: My first real experience with a real-time first-person shooter was Doom. The idea of running around a large map, using a variety of weapons to blow away a variety of monsters very much appealed to me. Even then, though, I was wondering how even such a well-muscled space marine could lug around seven or eight different weapons at the same time, along with several hundred rounds of ammunition. Delta Force 2 is decidedly more realistic in this regard. While still technically a first-person shooting game, it differs substantially from the ‘traditional' games of this genre in several significant ways and I will go into this further into the review. Da Specifications The game is not simple or low-end in terms of hardware requirements; according to the box, it needs at least a 400-megahertz CPU and 64 megabytes of RAM. The game does not require (but can make use of) a 3D accelerator card. Even though the machine I tested it on more than meets these requirements, at 500 MHz, I still found the game to be a bit sluggish when the high-powered scopes were used. It certainly wasn't unplayable, just mildly irritating. Da Installation The game largely installed itself. It was quick and relatively painless as installations went. Just follow the bouncing prompt… Da Graphics DF2 has, by far, the best terrain I have ever seen for a first-person game. It is varied and highly detailed, with different types of ground-cover (in which you can hide, crawl or swim). Every aspect of the terrain is stunning; it's smooth, with bumps, hills and mountains of every conceivable size all around you. The maps are huge – and the detail goes on throughout. If you zoom in at a hillside a kilometre away with your binoculars or ‘scope, the trees jump out at you in all their gloriously-rendered foliage. The people are also very well rendered. You get a real sense that they are different, from snowsuit-clad officers in the mountains of Northern Europe to bandana-and-tshirt-wearing rebels of Africa. They have different weapons, and different positions of holding them; an officer with a pistol might hold it down by his hip, but some of the rebels rest their automatic weapons vertically on their shoulders. Another interesting set of variables was the weather. Some missions took place in fog, rain or snow, and each could reduce your visibility (which is both good and bad). Night missions I found to be the most challenging. Your only visibility is a small goggle-shaped section in the centre of the screen, or through the weapon's scope, if you have one. Even with the image-enhancement, though, it's almost impossible to make out where you are going, and I've managed to stumble off cliffs several times while trying to complete night missions. Da Sound Each of the weapons sounds different, and it's not just for show. If you use the silenced pistol instead of the more powerful loud version, you stand a far greater chance of not being noticed by people standing nearby. Paying attention to the shouts of people near you can alert you to an enemy you didn't know was there. If you hear the gentle thwips of stray rounds hitting the ground beside your head, you know someone's shooting at you, and it's time to move. Da Gameplay Single-Player The first step of the game is to choose your soldier. I liked the wide variety of faces you could choose from, as well as the flags of different countries. I could be a Canadian soldier, and my girlfriend could be South African – I really appreciated that detail. My first clue that this game was unlike the more traditional Doom and Quake games was the realisation that you can only carry one main weapon, as well as a pistol and two pieces of secondary gear. The choice of main weapon is very important, and it will dictate what kind of tactics you can employ in the mission. After playing a mission a few times (and dying each time), I almost invariably went back and changed my gear to better-suit the reality of the mission. My second clue came when I got into the game itself and began looking around; you have no health or armour indicators. As in real life, you can only take one, or maybe two (if you're lucky) hits before you die. And you can't jump off cliffs with impunity; anything more than 15 feet or so and you will take damage when you hit the ground. Each of the missions has a unique set of requirements and threats, requiring you to use different tactics to accomplish them. One rather frustrating aspect of the missions was that occasionally you would be required to blow up a helicopter or tank, and if you didn't have the foresight to bring a LAW rocket with you, you are simply out of luck. Another potentially frustrating aspect of the game is the inability to save halfway through a mission. It can sometimes take upwards of 45 minutes to finish a mission, and getting killed by one of the last of the enemies can be excruciating. I repeated some of the missions so often that I could almost play the first ten minutes with my eyes closed. On the other hand, this situation forces you to use strategy. You can't jump up and run into an armed camp with your weapon blazing, because you will be cut down in moments. Careful observation from a distance is the way to go here. Know where the enemy is before approaching them. Multiplayer Using NovaWorld, the game's internet multiplayer section, is very easy. You may be required to update the game software if a new version has come out, but the process for this is totally automatic. There is the standard variety of game styles, including the traditional Deathmatch and Capture The Flag, as well as King of the Hill and others. The actual multiplayer gameplay was, however, extremely frustrating. Because each player can only take one or two shots before dying, and most maps can have up to 32 people playing at once, the average life expectancy is depressingly short. There is little or no mercy on NovaWorld – the only way to learn the ropes is through the Art of Repeated Deaths. Da Conclusion There was obviously a lot of work put into the game's special effects. The graphics and sound are simply excellent. It's too bad, then, that there are some rather major frustrations in the actual gameplay; other than those it's really a great game, a solid addition to the ranks of non-standard first-person shooters. It definitely is an addicting game, despite its flaws. Perhaps eventually I'll even get good enough at it to last longer than ten seconds on NovaWorld… Rating: A solid 4 joysticks. This title reviewed by DA GAMEBOYZ contributor Random



 
 

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