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B'heivje(r) Interactive - Developer
Infogrames - Distributor

ESRB Rating: Everyone
Genre: 3D Adventure

Introduction

Attention Bugs Bunny afficionados your favourite long eared wabbit, along with a crew of other Warner Brothers characters, is now the star of his own computer game. For the first time Bugs is free to move around in a fully 3D world instead of the 2D platform games he was constrained to in the past. This is a game that can be enjoyed by children 12 and under who will find it quite challenging but at the same time a confidence builder as levels can be reached fairly easily though not without frustrating moments. Young players will find Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time to be a solid game with smooth graphics, great sound and with the reliable hilarity of the WB characters though the more avid gamer will find it to be lackluster.

Minimum Requirements (Recommended)

Pentium 166MHz (Pentium 200MHz)
Windows 95/98 or NT 4.0 (Windows 95/98)
16MB RAM (32MB RAM)
4X CD-ROM
6MB Hard Drive Space (120MB Hard Drive Space)
16-bit Windows 9x compatible soundcard
2MB PCI Video Card (8MB Video card w/ OpenGL support)
Windows 9x Compatible Keyboard (Windows 9x Compatible Gamepad or Joystick)

Installation

There's not much I can say about installation, except that it was a breeze. Installation has become much easier in the past few years with no complicated target directories just a click of a few buttons. You have 3 options as far as installation size goes: minimal (6MB) and normal (120MB) or custom. I have a 12x CD-ROM, which is fast enough to load levels without a grueling wait. However, if you have a 6x or slower CR-ROM I'd suggest going with the largest install you can in order to avoid pauses in gameplay waiting for the CD-ROM to catch up.

Graphics

Fresh off a round of Tomb RaiderGL I found the graphics to be a step backward by comparison. However, this game is based on a cartoon world so the graphics engine is good enough for its purpose. To a young gamer, the one most likely to play the game, the graphics are faithful to the Looney Toons Show but anyone with previous gaming experience will find it a let down. The game was designed to work on the PlayStation, therefore, the graphics don't take advantage of what computers have to offer such as amazing 3D accelerators and AGP texturing. The graphics aren't as finely polished as other adventure games and has glitches like textures shifting. The animations are smooth with many in-game cut scenes. I highly suggest an OpenGL capable card but many game systems have one anyway. If you don't have a 3D accelerator you have 2 choices, high quality and low quality software rendering. The high quality is not quite as pretty as GL, but is very slow so I recommend at least a P2-233 or above. If you're like me and stuck with a slow CPU the low quality setting is much less appealing but very quick. I reviewed the game on a P166 w/ Voodoo2 and noticed only minimal slow down in busy sections.

Sound

Sound is easily the best area of the game, with the same voices you remember from the show. The voices are remarkably similar to the cartoons we all know and fondly remember. As expected the game has all the signature catchphrases like "What's up doc?" or "We're hunting wascaly wabbits!" The music contains the same familiar tunes from the cartoons, which fits the game perfectly. The other sound effects: ACME boxes breaking, Bug's helicopter ears, etc... all sound like they came from the official WB sound library.

Gameplay

Gameplay in Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time is a mixed bag. The style of gameplay is similar to console adventures like Crash Bandicoot and Mario64. The plot is as thin as it comes. Bugs is on his way to Pismo Beach when he takes a wrong turn, gets lost and stumbles across a time machine, so being a curious bunny he hops on and ends up in a time vortex. The only place open is a portal to "Nowhere". Upon entering Bugs meets a sorcerer named Merlin who will help Bugs along his journey. Merlin informs Bugs that he is lost in time and must collect enough clocks from various time periods to power his time machine so he may return home.

With that all shown through a quick cut scene, you proceed to a brief training level, here Merlin teaches you basic controls and actions such as jumping, sneaking around and throwing objects etc. Once you're familiar with the basics you're warped off to the "Stone Age" where you encounter a loincloth clad Elmer Fudd. You must journey through a distinctly pre-historic environment gathering carrots and clocks.

The bulk of the game is comprised of similar exercises except you have a choice of 5 eras. Each era is complete with its own famous WB character for Bugs to tangle with. The game features Yosemite Sam in the Pirate Year, Marvin the Martian in Dimension X and so on. The game is full of the same hilarious antics found in the Saturday morning cartoon. My favorite is when Bugs first encounters Merlin. Bugs asks for some of Merlin's magic power so Merlin turns him into a pig. Then Bugs, holding a lighter in his hand, makes it appear his thumb is on fire. Merlin can't do the same trick when Bugs is just fooling him. It's hilarious because it reminds me so much of the TV show.

Sadly the game suffers from some interface problems; for one the control is a real pain. When you first take control of bugs it's quite hard to navigate but you catch on after awhile. Though I mainly play FPS games I think the controls could have been more intuitive like Tomb Raider. The camera is another problem; it often moves to funny angles. This wouldn't be more than an annoyance but the controls work in relation to the camera so when the camera pans in the middle of a difficult jumping puzzle you often fall and must redo the whole thing. I noted earlier that the graphics don't take advantage of the processing power of the home PC.

Another thing they overlook is the fact that computers have enormous amounts of storage space to hold savegame files. When gaming on a PlayStation you must save your game on a memory card, which is capable of holding only a few savegames. Because of this, most PlayStation games only allow you to save at certain spots in the game. This can get very annoying such as when you complete a tough puzzle but fall off a ledge only to be sent back to the last checkpoint and do it over.

The last issue I'd like to address are the frustrating puzzles. I got to a few points in the game where it was unclear as to what to do and it become incredibly hard to find a solution. Sure, every game has challenges but these are beyond fun and surely baffling for younger children. Thankfully you get unlimited "retrys" so you never have to do a whole era over. To sum it up, anyone over the age of 12 will get bored after a few levels while the younger gamers will definately enjoy it aside from the difficulty of some parts.

Conclusion

Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time is a cute, humorous game that lacks the polish to push it to the top of its genre. I would only recommend this game to children under the age of 12 who would appreciate the game for the cartoony humor and familiar characters. So point the joystick up for the pre-teen crowd but down for the older set.

Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time was reviewed by gameboyz contributor, Piers "Get off My Plane!" MacDonald on his...

Pentium 166MHz (non-MMX)
Windows 98
64MB SDRAM
12x Mitsumi CD-ROM
3.2GB IBM Hard Drive
Creative AWE32 sound card
Matrox Millennium 4MB w/ 12MB Guillemot Voodoo2
Logitech Keyboard

Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time

 

Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time

ESRB: Rating Pending - RP
Platform: PC Games
Category: Action Games
 
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B'heivje(r) Interactive - Developer Infogrames - Distributor ESRB Rating: Everyone Genre: 3D Adventure Introduction Attention Bugs Bunny afficionados your favourite long eared wabbit, along with a crew of other Warner Brothers characters, is now the star of his own computer game. For the first time Bugs is free to move around in a fully 3D world instead of the 2D platform games he was constrained to in the past. This is a game that can be enjoyed by children 12 and under who will find it quite challenging but at the same time a confidence builder as levels can be reached fairly easily though not without frustrating moments. Young players will find Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time to be a solid game with smooth graphics, great sound and with the reliable hilarity of the WB characters though the more avid gamer will find it to be lackluster. Minimum Requirements (Recommended) Pentium 166MHz (Pentium 200MHz) Windows 95/98 or NT 4.0 (Windows 95/98) 16MB RAM (32MB RAM) 4X CD-ROM 6MB Hard Drive Space (120MB Hard Drive Space) 16-bit Windows 9x compatible soundcard 2MB PCI Video Card (8MB Video card w/ OpenGL support) Windows 9x Compatible Keyboard (Windows 9x Compatible Gamepad or Joystick) Installation There's not much I can say about installation, except that it was a breeze. Installation has become much easier in the past few years with no complicated target directories just a click of a few buttons. You have 3 options as far as installation size goes: minimal (6MB) and normal (120MB) or custom. I have a 12x CD-ROM, which is fast enough to load levels without a grueling wait. However, if you have a 6x or slower CR-ROM I'd suggest going with the largest install you can in order to avoid pauses in gameplay waiting for the CD-ROM to catch up. Graphics Fresh off a round of Tomb RaiderGL I found the graphics to be a step backward by comparison. However, this game is based on a cartoon world so the graphics engine is good enough for its purpose. To a young gamer, the one most likely to play the game, the graphics are faithful to the Looney Toons Show but anyone with previous gaming experience will find it a let down. The game was designed to work on the PlayStation, therefore, the graphics don't take advantage of what computers have to offer such as amazing 3D accelerators and AGP texturing. The graphics aren't as finely polished as other adventure games and has glitches like textures shifting. The animations are smooth with many in-game cut scenes. I highly suggest an OpenGL capable card but many game systems have one anyway. If you don't have a 3D accelerator you have 2 choices, high quality and low quality software rendering. The high quality is not quite as pretty as GL, but is very slow so I recommend at least a P2-233 or above. If you're like me and stuck with a slow CPU the low quality setting is much less appealing but very quick. I reviewed the game on a P166 w/ Voodoo2 and noticed only minimal slow down in busy sections. Sound Sound is easily the best area of the game, with the same voices you remember from the show. The voices are remarkably similar to the cartoons we all know and fondly remember. As expected the game has all the signature catchphrases like "What's up doc?" or "We're hunting wascaly wabbits!" The music contains the same familiar tunes from the cartoons, which fits the game perfectly. The other sound effects: ACME boxes breaking, Bug's helicopter ears, etc... all sound like they came from the official WB sound library. Gameplay Gameplay in Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time is a mixed bag. The style of gameplay is similar to console adventures like Crash Bandicoot and Mario64. The plot is as thin as it comes. Bugs is on his way to Pismo Beach when he takes a wrong turn, gets lost and stumbles across a time machine, so being a curious bunny he hops on and ends up in a time vortex. The only place open is a portal to "Nowhere". Upon entering Bugs meets a sorcerer named Merlin who will help Bugs along his journey. Merlin informs Bugs that he is lost in time and must collect enough clocks from various time periods to power his time machine so he may return home. With that all shown through a quick cut scene, you proceed to a brief training level, here Merlin teaches you basic controls and actions such as jumping, sneaking around and throwing objects etc. Once you're familiar with the basics you're warped off to the "Stone Age" where you encounter a loincloth clad Elmer Fudd. You must journey through a distinctly pre-historic environment gathering carrots and clocks. The bulk of the game is comprised of similar exercises except you have a choice of 5 eras. Each era is complete with its own famous WB character for Bugs to tangle with. The game features Yosemite Sam in the Pirate Year, Marvin the Martian in Dimension X and so on. The game is full of the same hilarious antics found in the Saturday morning cartoon. My favorite is when Bugs first encounters Merlin. Bugs asks for some of Merlin's magic power so Merlin turns him into a pig. Then Bugs, holding a lighter in his hand, makes it appear his thumb is on fire. Merlin can't do the same trick when Bugs is just fooling him. It's hilarious because it reminds me so much of the TV show. Sadly the game suffers from some interface problems; for one the control is a real pain. When you first take control of bugs it's quite hard to navigate but you catch on after awhile. Though I mainly play FPS games I think the controls could have been more intuitive like Tomb Raider. The camera is another problem; it often moves to funny angles. This wouldn't be more than an annoyance but the controls work in relation to the camera so when the camera pans in the middle of a difficult jumping puzzle you often fall and must redo the whole thing. I noted earlier that the graphics don't take advantage of the processing power of the home PC. Another thing they overlook is the fact that computers have enormous amounts of storage space to hold savegame files. When gaming on a PlayStation you must save your game on a memory card, which is capable of holding only a few savegames. Because of this, most PlayStation games only allow you to save at certain spots in the game. This can get very annoying such as when you complete a tough puzzle but fall off a ledge only to be sent back to the last checkpoint and do it over. The last issue I'd like to address are the frustrating puzzles. I got to a few points in the game where it was unclear as to what to do and it become incredibly hard to find a solution. Sure, every game has challenges but these are beyond fun and surely baffling for younger children. Thankfully you get unlimited "retrys" so you never have to do a whole era over. To sum it up, anyone over the age of 12 will get bored after a few levels while the younger gamers will definately enjoy it aside from the difficulty of some parts. Conclusion Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time is a cute, humorous game that lacks the polish to push it to the top of its genre. I would only recommend this game to children under the age of 12 who would appreciate the game for the cartoony humor and familiar characters. So point the joystick up for the pre-teen crowd but down for the older set. Bugs Bunny: Lost in Time was reviewed by gameboyz contributor, Piers "Get off My Plane!" MacDonald on his... Pentium 166MHz (non-MMX) Windows 98 64MB SDRAM 12x Mitsumi CD-ROM 3.2GB IBM Hard Drive Creative AWE32 sound card Matrox Millennium 4MB w/ 12MB Guillemot Voodoo2 Logitech Keyboard



 
 

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