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Overall Rating: 9.5 out of 10

Introduction:

I'm a power projector user; I use my projector for Games, DVD's and PC use. I need a projector that offers a superior picture whether I'm working in MS Word (like now), watching Batman Begins (last night), or playing Far Cry on my Xbox (last night as well).

Here is a picture Home Theater Test Lab.

Here is a close up of the 4805

I've been playing with the Infocus Screenplay 4805 projector for two weeks now. The 4805 is the "economy" model of the Infocus projector line. Trust me folks, there's nothing "economy" about this projector. It has performance written all over it. Recently I played Far Cry Instincts for 4 hours straight, with no stopping for nutin. Do that on a regular TV and you might walk away with sore eyes and hands. I walked away with motion sickness, and it took my stomach a whole hour to settle down.

I had some friends over for "Dinner and a Movie" and they were speechless for five minutes after the movie was finished. Then they couldn't stop talking. "Where did you get this? How did you set it up? How much do they cost?"

When I told them the price for the 4805 was only $1,099, they immediately said "I'm buying one." I'll be setting up the projectors in their homes in November.

For those of you out there considering a Plasma or LCD TV, I highly recommend you look at the Infocus Screenplay 4805 before you take a plunge into the high def end of the pool. Standard HDTV's can be expensive, finicky, and yes, cumbersome. A 50 inch LCD TV may be thin, but it's still 50 inches wide.

Projectors are small in size, about the size of a small pizza box, but large in performance. The only major flaw with projectors is ambient light. As long as the projector is in a room where external light can be controlled, its performance is exceptional.

Why have projectors suddenly become the "next best thing?" You can thank Dr. Larry Hornbeck of Texas Instruments, who invented DLP, or Digital Light Processing chips.

The DLP chip is probably the world's most sophisticated light switch. It contains a rectangular array of up to 2 million hinge-mounted microscopic mirrors; each of these micromirrors measures less than one-fifth the width of a human hair.

When a DLP chip is coordinated with a digital video or graphic signal, a light source, and a projection lens, its mirrors can reflect an all-digital image onto a screen or other surface. The DLP chip and the sophisticated electronics that surround it are what we call Digital Light Processing technology.

This review is about real life scenarios and I don't get too caught up in feature creep. I'm mainly concerned with quality, price and performance. Too many sales people get caught up in "Spec Wars" and try and sell you on something that you're not going notice anyways. Let me put it in layman terms, something I'm quite familiar with. You take two cars

Infocus Screenplay 4805
 

Infocus Screenplay 4805

ESRB: ---
Platform: Home Theater
Category: n/a
 
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Overall Rating: 9.5 out of 10 Introduction: I'm a power projector user; I use my projector for Games, DVD's and PC use. I need a projector that offers a superior picture whether I'm working in MS Word (like now), watching Batman Begins (last night), or playing Far Cry on my Xbox (last night as well).
Here is a picture Home Theater Test Lab.
Here is a close up of the 4805
I've been playing with the Infocus Screenplay 4805 projector for two weeks now. The 4805 is the "economy" model of the Infocus projector line. Trust me folks, there's nothing "economy" about this projector. It has performance written all over it. Recently I played Far Cry Instincts for 4 hours straight, with no stopping for nutin. Do that on a regular TV and you might walk away with sore eyes and hands. I walked away with motion sickness, and it took my stomach a whole hour to settle down. I had some friends over for "Dinner and a Movie" and they were speechless for five minutes after the movie was finished. Then they couldn't stop talking. "Where did you get this? How did you set it up? How much do they cost?" When I told them the price for the 4805 was only $1,099, they immediately said "I'm buying one." I'll be setting up the projectors in their homes in November. For those of you out there considering a Plasma or LCD TV, I highly recommend you look at the Infocus Screenplay 4805 before you take a plunge into the high def end of the pool. Standard HDTV's can be expensive, finicky, and yes, cumbersome. A 50 inch LCD TV may be thin, but it's still 50 inches wide. Projectors are small in size, about the size of a small pizza box, but large in performance. The only major flaw with projectors is ambient light. As long as the projector is in a room where external light can be controlled, its performance is exceptional. Why have projectors suddenly become the "next best thing?" You can thank Dr. Larry Hornbeck of Texas Instruments, who invented DLP, or Digital Light Processing chips. The DLP chip is probably the world's most sophisticated light switch. It contains a rectangular array of up to 2 million hinge-mounted microscopic mirrors; each of these micromirrors measures less than one-fifth the width of a human hair. When a DLP chip is coordinated with a digital video or graphic signal, a light source, and a projection lens, its mirrors can reflect an all-digital image onto a screen or other surface. The DLP chip and the sophisticated electronics that surround it are what we call Digital Light Processing technology. This review is about real life scenarios and I don't get too caught up in feature creep. I'm mainly concerned with quality, price and performance. Too many sales people get caught up in "Spec Wars" and try and sell you on something that you're not going notice anyways. Let me put it in layman terms, something I'm quite familiar with. You take two cars— one can go zero to 60 in 5.3 seconds and the other 5.7. Both are freakin fast enough that you'll never tell the difference, and yet one is worth 10 times more than the other. I'm going to focus on the main things you should look for in a projector and why the Infocus Screenplay 4805 excels in these categories making it a "must buy" for the new Home Theater/Entertainment shopper. 1. Contrast The term contrast refers to the amount of color or grayscale differentiation that exists between various image features in both analog and digital images. Images that have a higher contrast level generally display a greater degree of color or grayscale variation than those with lower contrast. The contrast level of the Screenplay 4805 is very impressive; the unit is rated at 2200:1. Just a few years ago this type of performance would have cost you 10k plus. The shadow detail and black level are phenomenal. 2. Projector screen Your screen and projector contrast go hand in hand; this is a bit of a segway from the projector review, but still very important nonetheless and should be taken into consideration if you should decide to purchase a 4805. Projector screens have a contrast level as well, from none (pure white screen) to high (almost dark grey) see below image. The basic rule of thumb here is that the darker the room, the lighter the screen. 3. Color balance Much like speakers are best left to one's own ear, color balance is a personal choice. Projectors have their color balances preset at the factory, but I always encourage people to play with their color settings and settle on the picture they like best. The color levels of the 4805 are quite impressive,—rich, vibrant and natural is the best way to describe what you get once you decide on a color balance that's right for you. Many things will come into play here, screen type, ambient light, room color etc… so please adjust and play with your settings. 4. Fan Noise For home theater projectors, this can be a source of nuisance for some folks, but more so with older models than new ones. The 4805 has two power levels, low and high lamp mode. While in low mode, the fan runs quietly in the background and is not noticeable. While in high mode, the fan noise can be a little higher and noticeable. This really doesn't present too much of a problem, since you are typically watching a movie or playing a game which is enough to cover the fan noise. When using the projector for straight visual purposes, like writing a review, set the unit to low lamp mode. The fan does remain on, albeit in much slower mode, while the projector is in stand-by mode. I turn the power off on my unit whenever we're not using it. or if we're away from home. If the power goes out while the projector is in standby mode, then comes back on, the projector will turn itself on again. Several times I've woken up or come home to a projector that is running. 5. Lamp Life Replacement lamps can be expensive for projectors— $300 - $400, and they typically need to be replaced every 2000 – 3000 hours. The Infocus Screenplay 4805's lamp life can be stretched out to 4000 hours if used in Low Lamp mode. 6. Pixelation Pixelation is when individual pixels from the display are apparent to the viewer. This can happen unintentionally, when a low-resolution image designed for an ordinary computer display is projected onto a large screen, and each pixel becomes separately viewable. This typically happens the closer you sit to the screen. It's like looking closely at a black and white newspaper picture— the bigger it becomes, the more you notice the little half-tone dots that make up the picture. The only time I noticed any level of pixelation was when I was sitting within 10 feet of the screen and text or subtitles appeared. This is not a large concern for me when watching movies, as I typically sit 15 feet away from the screen—pixelation is minute at best. A rule of thumb is to sit back two to two and a half times your screen's width. Pixelation will be more noticeable with games than with movies. Typically, there can be lots of text on a game screen—status, maps, instructions etc. Next Gen game consoles will work nicely with this projector and pixelation will not be as much of an issuem given the increase in image quality and presentation these new platforms will provide Don't let me scare you here; the overall projector gaming experience will blow you away and pixelation won't even be part of the equation. Remote Control The Remote Control is very easy to use and all the buttons are back lit. This comes in handy when you need to make adjustments while the lights are out. Accessing and adjusting the projectors settings is fairly simplistic and one doesn't need a PHD in electrical engineering to figure out how to make adjustments. Its medium sized and fits nicely in your hand. I was very impressed with its overall simplicity.
Conclusion Infocus is becoming the dominant player in the projector field. The first projector I ever bought was an Infocus X1 and I still use it to this day. The 4805 is the perfect unit for people just getting into the world of Home Theater and Home Entertainment. In many cases, this could be the first and last unit you purchase for a very long time. Not everyone has the money Bill Gates does; most of us are just average Joes and Jills trying to get the most for our dollar. Simply put, there is no LCD or Plasma TV that can touch the 4805 for price and performance and this should be, IMHO, given first consideration when contemplating a Home Theater/Entertainment room. Infocus Screenplay 4805 Specs Communication: USB Computer: Digital and analog PC, Macintosh®, up to 1024x768 resolution through intelligent resizing Video: Component and RGB HDTV (720p, 1035i, 1080i). DVI with HDCP for digital video and encrypted digital video. Component EDTV (480p, 576p progressive scan), Component, Composite and S-Video standard TV video (480i, 576i, composite SCART with adapter, NTSC, NTSC M 4.43, PAL: B, G, H, I, M, N; SECAM: M.) INPUTS & OUTPUTS 1 — Component (RCA): HDTV, EDTV (progressive), and Standard TV component video (interlaced) 1 — S-Video: Standard Video 1 — Composite (RCA): Standard Video 1 — Stereo RCA jacks: L&R Audio input 1 — 3.5mm Mini-Jack: 12v screen-drop 1 — 3.5mm Stereo Mini-Jack: Audio output (variable) 1 — DVI (M1): HDTV RGB, HDTV Component, Digital Visual Interface (DVI) with HDCP decryption, computer,and USB, HDMI via available adapter DISPLAY Projection System: New TI DarkChip2T 480p 12° DDR DMD Resolution: 854 x 480 (16:9) Projection Lens: All glass. F/2.4, 21-25mm focal length Color Wheel: Proprietary, 6-segment color wheel, (6500K color temperature), D65 color calibration Calibrated Contrast Ratio: 2000:1 full on/full off Lamp (dual mode): 160/200 watt SHP, 3000 hour average lifetime Video Optimized Lumens: 750 ANSI max Modes: Front/rear/ceiling mode Focusing Distance: 5/ 1.5m to Keystone Correction: Digital, up to +/- 20° Vertical SMPTE Brightness: Up to 9 ( 2.74m) wide, 16:9 screen Throw Ratio: 1.77:1 - 2.13:1 (distance/width) GENERAL Conformances: UL, c-Ul, TUV GS, GOST, C-Tick, NOM, IRAM, FCC B, CISPR22/EN55022, EN 55024/CISPR 24, CB certified according to IEC60950/EN60950; 1997, P(SE), MIC Menu Languages: English, Spanish, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Italian, Norwegian, Russian, Chinese Simple, Chinese Traditional Operating Temperature: 5° - 40° C at sea level (0 - 10,000') ; 41° - 104° F Power Supply: 100V - 240V at 50 - 60 Hz Product Dimensions: 4.2" (H) x 9.8" (W) x 12.5" (L); 10.6cm x 24.9cm x 31.8cm Ships with: Power cord, Home Entertainment remote, S-video cable, AV cable, computer cable, printed user's guide (English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Norwegian) Weight: 6.8 lbs/3.1 kg Warranty  Projector: 2 Years  Accessories: 1 Year  Lamp: 90 Days







 
 

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