0
Your rating: None

Features

1 player
Memory card (19 blocks)
Progressive scan compatible

The story of Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance starts off with Ike, who is a young ranger in his father's mercenary band, training with dear old dad. While out and about he gets news that the neighboring country of Daein has invaded his homeland of Crimea. He and his father are sure it's nothing to worry about until they find Crimea's princess fleeing from the capital as it has been taken over and the royal family slain. Now Ike and the mercenaries must assure the princess' safety as she dashes toward the mighty country of Begnion to seek refuge, but the plot thickens as they must hurry as Daein's army is close behind.

Graphics

The graphics in Fire Emblem: PoR are by far the best of the series and quite at home on the Gamecube. The textures of such thing's like capes, flower petals and hair move as one would expect (well the hair is more anime style but it's still pretty good) in this series on a home console. The lighting and movements of the characters (e.g. muscles and limbs) are also well done as they pull you further into to the world of Fire Emblem. The colors are vibrant and bright as they manage to jump off the screen. The grid map, something that is key to this series, is now presented from an overhead 3D style. This new looking battle system is very nice to look at and is one of the elements that make this game addictive. It is a big improvement from the previous Fire Emblem games and makes it that much better looking of a game. There are details in this game that are also worth mentioning. During gameplay the pictures of the individual characters blink, move, and talk when they speak or someone else enters the conversation. It is these little visual details that make for a very pleasing game. As for the menus, they had more features then I found were necessary but they were presented in a very manageable and easy to the eye fashion. Overall the graphics were very enjoyable and I appreciated the work that was put into the looks of this game.

Sound

If there is one area that Fire Emblem exceeds in it is definitely the audio department. The vast variety of sound effects and music really help bring this game to life. The music is a medieval style and it seems to add a touch of reality. During gameplay there are many different situations, emotionally speaking, and the music changes the mood or intensity of each moment perfectly. Whether you are in the midst of a cruel battle zone, or just hanging around in a tranquil forest, Fire Emblem can express any mood in any setting and it is something that I found helped make the game that much more of an enjoyable experience. The rest of the sound effects are rich and very appropriate for the setting of the game and they have a fair level of realism to them. Everything from the clopping of horse hooves, the flapping of birds wings to the sound of footsteps are just a few examples of well done sound effects that the game has to offer.

Gameplay

The gameplay is very true to the Fire Emblem style of gaming as all the games in the series are a strategy-RPG. To those who have never played a Fire Emblem game it progresses like an RPG but requires the full usage of your brain in an effort to keep your army alive, this is where the strategy is. While in the battlefield you must keep your eyes open for terrains that could tip the scales in your favor to help win a decisive battle. For instance, a thicket will increase your evasion, heal bushes will heal you and your party but be careful of beach terrain as it will slowdown the movement of your party. On the map you may occasionally find houses as well. These may give you something good if you visit them, however if there are pirates in the area they will try to destroy the houses before you get there.

Fire Emblem's battle system has a variety of factors that add to a successful attack. There is a weapon triangle to consider, sword beats axe, axe beats lance, and lance beats sword. This is kind of like a big battle of rock, paper, and scissors. In addition to this there is also a magic triangle, well sort of. You have the three basic elements: fire, wind and thunder. Here fire beats wind, wind beats thunder, and thunder beats fire, but there is also a light element that is neither strong nor weak against the others. Battles also depend on the types of unit you may use. All of these factors make up for a game requiring managment and thinking skills.

In this home console version of Fire Emblem there are two different races: Laguz and Beorc. Laguz are demi-humans that have the ability to change into animals whereas the Beorc are humans who use armour and weapons for battle. Within the Laguz tribe there are three more sub-tribes: the Beast tribe, the Bird tribe, and the Dragon tribe. The Beast tribe consists of domestic cats and tigers. Tigers are blessed with strength, while cats have the greater agility. The Bird tribes have hawks, crows, and herons. Hawks are strong and crows are fast. The herons don't actually fight though as they have a special chant that allows players that have already moved to move once again. The Dragon tribe consists of only red dragons who have powerful attacks and high defence. I have to say that they can be a real pain to fight because of this. The Laguz can only transform when their transformation bar is full, which is there main weakness. However, to further complicate things if you have a Laguz stone you can transform without filling the bar. Yep, this game makes you think. The other race, the Beorc, has advantages and disadvantages as well. One of the disadvantages is that their weapons can break after multiple uses. On a positive note, Beorc can also change classes, whereas the Laguz cannot. This can happen in one of two ways: by reaching level 21 or by using a master seal, which allows any unit to change classes if they have reached level 10 or over. For example, a mage will become a sage, having increased magical abilities.

One thing you must consider, and something I feel I have to forewarn you about, is that each member of your army has unique characteristics and once they die you can't get them back unless you reset the game. I do admit that I have had to do this on more than one occasion due to the fact that I lost an important member of my tribe. This is definitely a thinking game and it is one that should not be started if you aren't prepared to use your brain power. It has challenges but it is very rewarding when you defeat the enemy in a long and heated battle, something that made me come back for more.

Conclusion

I found Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance to be a most enjoyable game. The story and graphics really impressed me to the point where I couldn't even sleep without dreaming about grids and battle tactics. The lack of any multiplayer was disappointing but hey, maybe next time. This game is sure to keep you playing for hours on end. In my opinion Nintendo has really improved the Fire Emblem series by bringing it to the Gamecube. I highly recommend playing this game and if there is ever a sequel I will definitely be in line for it.

Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance

 

Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance

ESRB: Teen - T
Platform: Gamecube
Category: n/a
 
Share/Bookmark
8
9
8
10
8.75
 
Author:
Features 1 player Memory card (19 blocks) Progressive scan compatible The story of Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance starts off with Ike, who is a young ranger in his father's mercenary band, training with dear old dad. While out and about he gets news that the neighboring country of Daein has invaded his homeland of Crimea. He and his father are sure it's nothing to worry about until they find Crimea's princess fleeing from the capital as it has been taken over and the royal family slain. Now Ike and the mercenaries must assure the princess' safety as she dashes toward the mighty country of Begnion to seek refuge, but the plot thickens as they must hurry as Daein's army is close behind. Graphics The graphics in Fire Emblem: PoR are by far the best of the series and quite at home on the Gamecube. The textures of such thing's like capes, flower petals and hair move as one would expect (well the hair is more anime style but it's still pretty good) in this series on a home console. The lighting and movements of the characters (e.g. muscles and limbs) are also well done as they pull you further into to the world of Fire Emblem. The colors are vibrant and bright as they manage to jump off the screen. The grid map, something that is key to this series, is now presented from an overhead 3D style. This new looking battle system is very nice to look at and is one of the elements that make this game addictive. It is a big improvement from the previous Fire Emblem games and makes it that much better looking of a game. There are details in this game that are also worth mentioning. During gameplay the pictures of the individual characters blink, move, and talk when they speak or someone else enters the conversation. It is these little visual details that make for a very pleasing game. As for the menus, they had more features then I found were necessary but they were presented in a very manageable and easy to the eye fashion. Overall the graphics were very enjoyable and I appreciated the work that was put into the looks of this game. Sound If there is one area that Fire Emblem exceeds in it is definitely the audio department. The vast variety of sound effects and music really help bring this game to life. The music is a medieval style and it seems to add a touch of reality. During gameplay there are many different situations, emotionally speaking, and the music changes the mood or intensity of each moment perfectly. Whether you are in the midst of a cruel battle zone, or just hanging around in a tranquil forest, Fire Emblem can express any mood in any setting and it is something that I found helped make the game that much more of an enjoyable experience. The rest of the sound effects are rich and very appropriate for the setting of the game and they have a fair level of realism to them. Everything from the clopping of horse hooves, the flapping of birds wings to the sound of footsteps are just a few examples of well done sound effects that the game has to offer. Gameplay The gameplay is very true to the Fire Emblem style of gaming as all the games in the series are a strategy-RPG. To those who have never played a Fire Emblem game it progresses like an RPG but requires the full usage of your brain in an effort to keep your army alive, this is where the strategy is. While in the battlefield you must keep your eyes open for terrains that could tip the scales in your favor to help win a decisive battle. For instance, a thicket will increase your evasion, heal bushes will heal you and your party but be careful of beach terrain as it will slowdown the movement of your party. On the map you may occasionally find houses as well. These may give you something good if you visit them, however if there are pirates in the area they will try to destroy the houses before you get there. Fire Emblem's battle system has a variety of factors that add to a successful attack. There is a weapon triangle to consider, sword beats axe, axe beats lance, and lance beats sword. This is kind of like a big battle of rock, paper, and scissors. In addition to this there is also a magic triangle, well sort of. You have the three basic elements: fire, wind and thunder. Here fire beats wind, wind beats thunder, and thunder beats fire, but there is also a light element that is neither strong nor weak against the others. Battles also depend on the types of unit you may use. All of these factors make up for a game requiring managment and thinking skills. In this home console version of Fire Emblem there are two different races: Laguz and Beorc. Laguz are demi-humans that have the ability to change into animals whereas the Beorc are humans who use armour and weapons for battle. Within the Laguz tribe there are three more sub-tribes: the Beast tribe, the Bird tribe, and the Dragon tribe. The Beast tribe consists of domestic cats and tigers. Tigers are blessed with strength, while cats have the greater agility. The Bird tribes have hawks, crows, and herons. Hawks are strong and crows are fast. The herons don't actually fight though as they have a special chant that allows players that have already moved to move once again. The Dragon tribe consists of only red dragons who have powerful attacks and high defence. I have to say that they can be a real pain to fight because of this. The Laguz can only transform when their transformation bar is full, which is there main weakness. However, to further complicate things if you have a Laguz stone you can transform without filling the bar. Yep, this game makes you think. The other race, the Beorc, has advantages and disadvantages as well. One of the disadvantages is that their weapons can break after multiple uses. On a positive note, Beorc can also change classes, whereas the Laguz cannot. This can happen in one of two ways: by reaching level 21 or by using a master seal, which allows any unit to change classes if they have reached level 10 or over. For example, a mage will become a sage, having increased magical abilities. One thing you must consider, and something I feel I have to forewarn you about, is that each member of your army has unique characteristics and once they die you can't get them back unless you reset the game. I do admit that I have had to do this on more than one occasion due to the fact that I lost an important member of my tribe. This is definitely a thinking game and it is one that should not be started if you aren't prepared to use your brain power. It has challenges but it is very rewarding when you defeat the enemy in a long and heated battle, something that made me come back for more. Conclusion I found Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance to be a most enjoyable game. The story and graphics really impressed me to the point where I couldn't even sleep without dreaming about grids and battle tactics. The lack of any multiplayer was disappointing but hey, maybe next time. This game is sure to keep you playing for hours on end. In my opinion Nintendo has really improved the Fire Emblem series by bringing it to the Gamecube. I highly recommend playing this game and if there is ever a sequel I will definitely be in line for it.





 
 

Post this review on your own site!

Just agree to our Terms of Use and cut-paste your brains out.

Recommended for you...